Perspectives Monthly Lifestyle eNewsletter for March, 2019

Perspectives Monthly Lifestyle eNewsletter for March, 2019

Jack Turner presents:

 


SMART TIP:
Walking just 20 minutes daily at a brisk pace may help a 160-lb. person burn an extra 700 calories in one week. Either for weight loss or overall wellness, regular walks are a great way to keep healthy. 

 

WHO SAID IT?
“No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.”
[GET THE ANSWER]
 

TEST YOUR
KNOWLEDGE:
Q: According to the Government Accountability Office, what percentage of Americans will have to pay federal taxes to the Internal Revenue Service this year?

 

A)19%

B)21%

C)47%

D)60%

 

[GET THE ANSWER]
 

 

 

March, 2019

3-D Printing 2.0

Stop the presses: photons are powering a breakthrough.
[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Screen Out the Distractions

Better phone and tablet habits might just promote improved personal finances.

[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Planks, Push-Ups, Progress

Bodyweight training can give you a workout without equipment.

[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Recipe of the Month
Perfectly Roasted Sunday Chicken
[CLICK TO READ]

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

3-D Printing 2.0

Stop the presses: photons are powering a breakthrough.

 

Every year seems to bring new advances in 3-D printing capability. Now the technology has taken another major step: the usual method of printing objects, layer by layer, could soon give way to printing whole objects at once, using high-intensity light.  

 

The central problem with 3-D printing so far: speed, or more accurately, the lack thereof. If you want to print a large object, it can take hours, even days. Researchers at the University of California just created a 3-D printer that printed out a small replica of The Thinker, the great sculpture by Rodin, in only two minutes – a development with startling implications for manufacturing industries. This printer works like a reverse CT scan: it creates a 3-D image from scanned 2-D images of a physical object, and then, light projects the 3-D image into a tube filled with an acrylate synthetic resin (resin is commonly used in 3-D printing). A chemical in the resin absorbs photons, and when the light reaches the target intensity, the resin solidifies. The UC researchers nicknamed their printer “The Replicator,” as it seems like something out of Star Trek. While it can print only small objects, the hope is that the speedier technology will soon be used to output larger ones.1,2

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

Screen Out the Distractions

Better phone and tablet habits might just promote improved personal finances.

 

It is so easy to spend an hour a day (or longer) on major social media websites. Is that behavior a net positive? (Pun intended.) What if we spent more screen time using applications that could help us plan to spend and save wisely rather than simply just spending time distracting ourselves?

 

There are some very convenient apps geared toward the management of personal finances. Taking a look at your household budget daily through one of these many (free) budgeting apps can show you the state of your cash flow, your rate of saving, and your spending, by expense category. Additionally, you can download the apps for your retirement, investment, and bank accounts, and look at them weekly (or at least every once and a while) to see the balances and activity. There are also coupon-finder apps that will do that work for you (based on your preferences and wants) as well as organizer apps to let you create precise shopping lists (so you can refrain from impulse purchases that are not really worth the cost). A few apps have even been designed to lock you out of your favorite apps, so that you can assign more time to other things in your life. Social media is often great and rewarding, but too much phone time and screen time can affect our lives, and possibly even, our finances.3

 

 

Perspectives - Page Break

Planks, Push-Ups, Progress

Bodyweight training can give you a workout without equipment.

 

Imagine getting a great workout and quality strength training, without touching a machine. Bodyweight training offers such a path, for young and old. As the phrase implies, bodyweight training uses just your bodyweight for resistance.

 

As the Mayo Clinic notes, bodyweight exercise, done with the right form and technique, can prove just as effective as resistance training done at a gym with free weights or machines. If you get an aerobic workout in the fresh air and find a health club comparatively unappealing, some or all of your muscular training can come instead from bodyweight exercises at home or outside, such as squats, planks, push-ups, step-ups, lunges, and abdominal crunches. Old favorites can be changed up if they get stale, or if you want more of a challenge, a wall push-up or modified push-up can be supplanted with a classic push-up, for example. If you are afraid of shortchanging or over-exerting yourself through bodyweight workouts, talk to a trainer or instructor who can guide you. Remember that it is good to give each muscle group you work a day off, for recovery time.4